05 Apr

Managing Up a�� Developing a Healthy Relationship With Your Boss

Blog No Comments by Susan McCuistion

Managing Up a�� Developing a Healthy Relationship With Your BossEverybody who works has a boss. Sometimes it is challenging to establish just the right relationship. Some of us fear our bosses, or constantly try to please them. We may not like the boss or think he/she is qualified.A� Or maybe you think your boss is a downright jerk.A� Whatever your scenario, this month we will focus on issues that may arise in your relationship with your boss.

Believe it or not, your boss is human, too. Just like you, she has pressure and stress at work every day. Just like you, he is accountable to his superiors for his work, as well as your work. Just like you, she has stuff going on outside of work that may be occupying her thoughts, and she has to move beyond that to get work done.

Your relationship with your boss is one of mutual dependence. Your boss depends on you to get your job done, so he can get his done. It is beneficial for both of you, as well as the company, to work together well.

The idea of “managing up” is not a new idea, but few of us truly know how to do it well. So, how do you develop a healthy relationship with your boss?

First, it is important to understand your boss and the context within which she works. What are your bossa�� strengths and weaknesses? What are his work style and needs? How does she like to communicate? How does he deal with conflict? What pressures is she under from her boss?

Once you understand your boss, make sure you understand yourself. What are your work styles and preferences? How do they complement or conflict with your bossa��?

Use this information to develop ways to work with your boss in a way that fits both of your needs and styles. Key to this relationship will be communication, reliability, and honesty.

Communication clomid buy online, buy clomid online. : Understand that you do not work in a bubble, and that your boss is not a mind reader. Ask your boss for the information you need to understand your role and tasks within the larger picture of the organization. Develop and agree upon a set of mutual expectations with your boss, including how often and what kind of information needs to be communicated.

Reliability: When your boss asks you to do something, get it done. If you say you are going to be some place at a certain time, be there. Make sure you deliver when you say you are going to deliver. There are few things more frustrating to a boss than an employee who is not reliable.

Honesty: Dona��t down play issues or challenges thinking you have everything under control. If there is an issue, let her know. Present the challenge, along with how you are going to resolve it. That way, there are no surprises. If your boss is not able to trust you, then you better believe you are going to be micro-managed.

Building a healthy relationship with your boss is up to you. It can take some time, but in the long run, it is well worth it.

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03 Apr

Do You Spend Too Much Time Trying to Please the Boss?

Blog No Comments by Mareisha Winters

Do You Spend Too Much Time Trying to Please the Boss?Everybody who works has a boss. Sometimes it is challenging to establish just the right relationship. Some of us fear our bosses, or constantly try to please them. We may not like the boss or think he/she is qualified.  Or maybe you think your boss is a downright jerk.  Whatever your scenario, this month we will focus on issues that may arise in your relationship with your boss.

“I can’t tell you the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everyone.” –Ed Sheeran

We all want to please our boss for the simple fact that they could decide our job fate. But what if your people pleasing goes a little too far? Sometimes we try to please others so much that it becomes harmful to ourselves. When you start agreeing to things that go against your beliefs or that cause you emotional stress, you could be causing more harm than good.

A people-pleaser can be defined as a person “who feels they must do whatever it takes to make the people around them happy.” Okay so that doesn’t sound too terrible. It’s okay to have a few people in your life that you want to make sure are happy. The problem arises when you allow your happiness to be based on other people.

Here are some signs that you may be trying to please your boss too much:

  1. Your happiness at work depends on your boss’s approval and appreciation.
  2. You don’t handle criticism or confrontation well – in fact it makes you feel depressed.
  3. You say “yes” to whatever your boss asks you to do, even if it interferes with your personal and family commitments (e.g. working extra hours).
  4. You overly apologize when things go wrong at work.
  5. You are afraid to make a decision without consulting your boss (who probably wants you to be proactive).
  6. You don’t stick up for yourself when confronted by your boss regarding something that was not your fault.
  7. You allow your boss to take advantage of your good nature.

Why is all of this a bad thing? For one, if you’re constantly trying to please other people you are surely neglecting taking care of the most important person of all – you! Also, you may think that pleasing the boss will benefit your career in some way – maybe you’ll be first in line for the next promotion, or the last one thought of when layoffs come around. However, your behavior is having quite the contrary effect. Most people pleasers behave the way they do because they want to be liked and respected, when in reality they lose respect from being so giving. Often people pleasers are labeled as “pushovers”, “doormats”, “people with no backbone”. Does that sound like the type of person that your boss thinks highly of, or would consider for promotion?

If this sounds like it could be you, now’s the time to take your life back! Start saying “no” more often. Be more assertive. Build your self-confidence. In the end you will be more respected for being yourself than trying to be what you think others want you to be.

It’s All About the Boss!

01 Apr

Do You Know Your Boss’s Leadership Style?

Blog No Comments by Mary-Frances Winters

Do You Know Your Boss’s Leadership Style?Everybody who works has a boss. Sometimes it is challenging to establish just the right relationship. Some of us fear our bosses, or constantly try to please them. We may not like the boss or think he/she is qualified.  Or maybe you think your boss is a downright jerk.  Whatever your scenario, this month we will focus on issues that may arise in your relationship with your boss.

Many of us have seen the popular television series, The Office, portraying Steve Carell in the role of Michael Scott, as the extreme inept boss. Hopefully your boss is not of that ilk.

There have been many studies conducted by social scientists that explore different leadership styles.  The leadership style of your boss can make your work experience very pleasant or it can cause you great frustration to the point of you avoiding the boss, dreading coming work, or in extreme cases you may be trying change managers as fast as you can.  Authors Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman said in their book, First Break All the Rules: What The Worlds’ Greatest Managers Do Differently, that people don’t leave jobs, they leave managers.

There are many different types of leadership styles. We explore four of the most common ones.

Authoritarian/Autocratic: This style is used when leaders tell their employees what they want done and how they want it accomplished, without asking for input.

Bureaucratic:  This style is similar to autocratic leadership. Bureaucratic leaders work “by the book.” They follow rules rigorously, and ensure that their people follow procedures precisely.

Delegative: In this style, the leader allows the employees to make the decisions. However, the leader is still responsible for the decisions that are made. This is used when employees are able to analyze the situation and determine what needs to be done and how to do it.

Participatory: This style involves the leader including one or more employees in the decision making process of determining what to do and how to do it. The leader maintains the final decision making authority.

There are positives and negatives associated with each style.

Autocratic and bureaucratic styles are appropriate in crisis or life or death situations, such as may present themselves in the military.  When these styles are abused, they can show up as yelling, demeaning language or even bullying and can create stressful, low trusting work environments.

Authoritarian and bureaucratic styles were more popular after World War II when manufacturing companies were growing rapidly. Today, most management gurus believe that the authoritarian style should normally only be used only in high risk situations.  Sometimes you hear these styles characterized as “My Way or the Highway” leadership.

Delegating is most appropriate when you have a team with a lot of experience and expertise in a particular subject. The boss is confident in delegating the tasks as many on the team may have more knowledge that he/she does.  The boss however, still maintains accountability for outcomes. This style can be abused if it is used to blame others when things go wrong or to abdicate one’s leadership role.

Participatory leadership should be used whenever possible as research shows that employees are more productive and engaged with this style. When this style is used effectively, employees feel included and valued.  When leaders simply pay lip service to gathering input and do not include it in the final decision making, it can be demoralizing for employees.

Depending on how you like to be managed, any one of these styles could suit you. Maybe you just want the boss to tell you what to do so you don’t have to think about it or maybe you do not want to be micromanaged and the delegative style works for you.  In the end, it is important for you to know yourself and which of these styles will support you in creating a satisfactory work experience.

It’s All About the Boss!

How do you like to be managed? What leadership style works best for you?